Chamoru cultural experience

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Members of the Hurao Acadamy help set up traditional Chamoru foods for the Chamoru Cultural Festival here July 28. The festival was an event to help Airmen and their families to acclimate to Guam. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Mariah Haddenham/Released)
Members of the Hurao Acadamy help set up traditional Chamoru foods for the Chamoru Cultural Festival here July 28. The festival was an event to help Airmen and their families to acclimate to Guam. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Mariah Haddenham/Released)

Chamoru cultural experience

by: Airman 1st Class Mariah Haddenham | .
36th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: August 08, 2012

7/31/2012 - ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- The Chamoru Cultural festival, a cultural experience for all involved, took place at the Hot Spot here July 28.

The event was open to Team Andersen personnel and their family members. Activities included weaving, traditional dancing, Talaya fish net throwing and basic Chamoru language lessons.

"More events for single Airmen were needed and we wanted to throw an event showcasing Guam and its culture," said Jadine Lujan, Airman and Family Readiness Center volunteer coordinator. "We wanted to share what the island of Guam is really about and that helps us keep our culture alive."

Also attending the event were members from the Hurao Acadamy, the only Chamoru immersion school on Guam, which focuses on Chamoru culture and heritage.

"We were given the opportunity to be involved and we had all the resources readily available," said Anna Marie Arceo, Hurao Academy President and CEO.

Artists and teachers from the Hurao Academy volunteered their time to participate in the hands-on, culture-sharing experience.

"We want to mingle with the military," said Fransico Lizama, Hurao Academy blacksmith. "They are interested in our culture, and we want to teach them about it."

The A&FRC plans to hold similar events in the months of August and September in order to help new Airmen and their families acclimate to Guam.

"Meeting the families and welcoming them ourselves, as indigenous people, is my favorite part of the event," said Ms. Arceo. "It is good for the community to come together with the military in this culture-sharing experience because we live amongst each other. It helps form a bond between us all." 

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