Keeping it 100: Andersen officer perfect when it comes to fitness

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U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Christine Stabile, 36th Medical Support Squadron commander, swims laps Jan. 9, 2015, at the pool at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Stabile has earned 14 straight 100s since 2004, when the Air Force changed the physical fitness test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Hicks)
U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Christine Stabile, 36th Medical Support Squadron commander, swims laps Jan. 9, 2015, at the pool at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Stabile has earned 14 straight 100s since 2004, when the Air Force changed the physical fitness test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Hicks)

Keeping it 100: Andersen officer perfect when it comes to fitness

by: Staff Sgt. Robert Hicks | .
36th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: January 15, 2015

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam  -- When the Air Force changed its physical fitness testing program in 2004, one Airman from the 36th Medical Support Squadron at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, started an unbelievable streak.

Lt. Col. Christine Stabile, 36th MDSS Commander, has earned 14 straight perfect scores on her physical fitness test since the Air Force eliminated the cycle ergometry test in 2004 and implemented a new testing program.

"I was thrilled when they started the new fitness program in 2004," Stabile said. "It was good to see the Air Force holding Airmen accountable for being fit."

The test, which includes a waist measurement, push-ups, sit-ups and a mile-and-a-half run is currently required once a year for testers in the "excellent" category. Before the current test standards were implemented, tests could be administered several times a year which is how she earned 14 "perfect" scores.

She added the physical fitness test wasn't a challenge for her until 2010 when the Air Force changed the standards from less than 20 push-ups to 38 in her gender/age group and lowered the run time by more than a minute.

"In 2010, when the standards changed, I wasn't going to give up," Stabile said. "It was like the Air Force put a challenge there for me, and I was going to rise to the occasion and get that 100 to keep the streak going. I refuse to let the changes beat me or prevent me from having continued success."

When she first saw the new standards, she felt it was near impossible to score 100, until a wingman introduced her to a program that would keep the streak alive.

"I remember saying to my chief 'this is going to be really hard,' but he motivated me and said 'all you have to do is use the (100 push-up program).'" Stabile said. "So every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, people came to my office to do the push-up sets. I went from being able to do 17 perfect push-ups to 168 in six weeks."

The push-up program isn't the only thing Stabile takes pride in; she also swims every day for 30 minutes and rides her bike all around base instead of driving throughout the week to help her relax and maintain her physical fitness.

"It doesn't matter if it's sunny, cloudy or raining Lieutenant Colonel Stabile shows up every day at the same time ready to swim her laps," said Josh Reyes, Andersen life guard.

The squadron commander believes to be successful you must find something you love doing and stick with it until you get the results you're looking for.

"People don't like to do push-ups, sit-ups or running, but neither do I," Stabile said. "But, you can still be fit by finding an activity you love doing and sticking with it. I love going on hikes in the jungle, and I want to be able to do these types of things when I'm 90 and not only when I'm 48."

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