New chief petty officers pinned at ceremony

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Newly pinned Chief Master-at-Arms (EXW) Cole Schulz salutes of Maritime Expeditionary Security Group 1 Det. Guam salutes as he piped through sideboys during a pinning ceremony at The Big Screen Theatre on U.S. Naval Base Guam Sept. 14. Thirty five chief petty officers from 17 different commands accepted the rank and responsibility of CPO and were the first among the fleet to pin on their anchors. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeremy Starr/Released
Newly pinned Chief Master-at-Arms (EXW) Cole Schulz salutes of Maritime Expeditionary Security Group 1 Det. Guam salutes as he piped through sideboys during a pinning ceremony at The Big Screen Theatre on U.S. Naval Base Guam Sept. 14. Thirty five chief petty officers from 17 different commands accepted the rank and responsibility of CPO and were the first among the fleet to pin on their anchors. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeremy Starr/Released

New chief petty officers pinned at ceremony

by: Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeremy Starr & Airman 1st Class Mariah Haddenham | .
U.S. military | .
published: September 21, 2012

Guam Sailors accepted the rank and responsibilities of chief petty officer (CPO), during pinning ceremonies on U.S. Naval Base Guam (NBG) and Andersen Air Force Base Sept. 14.

The newly-pinned CPOs from different commands on island were among the first in the fleet to pin on their anchors.

“The Navy is the only uniformed service where putting on E-7 brings such responsibility and such authority,” said Chief Naval Air Crewman (AWS/NAC/AW) Dustin Martinson, “The change in uniform signifies the leap from petty officer to chief petty officer.”

Chief Master-at-Arms (SW) Chad Williams, of NBG Security spoke to the new members of the chiefs’ mess on NBG about age-old CPO wisdom.

“Take the attitude that you are part of the Navy, not merely just being a part of your department of an individual ship,” he said. “Try to do a little more than do a little less in a strict interpretation as what your duty demands. Dwell upon this point of view, this increase feeling of responsibility, this duty, which compels you to do a thing not because you have to do it but because it ought to be done.”

As part of Navy tradition, chief selects had to carry around charge books which are lists of entries noting a person’s accomplishments to be presented during the promotion or selection process. The books serve as records of wisdom and informal instruction meant to prepare the chief selects for their role as a chief.

“This continuing tradition is steeped in naval history,” said Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW) Jeremy Marco, of HSC-25 “The season itself is about developing and training tomorrow’s leaders.”

NBG guest speaker, NBG’s Command Master Chief  (SW/AW/SCW) John Lawry encouraged the new chiefs to continue to grow.

“Don’t stop learning when you put on your anchors today,” he said. “The pinning today is not the end of your journey but rather the beginning of the next phase of your career, one where the expectations are so much higher.”

During the ceremony, each new chief marched individually through sideboys for everyone in attendance to see and cheer.

Family members and friends pinned on two gold anchors to each newly appointed chief’s uniform and the Sailors’ sponsors placed a combination cover on their head.

The newly-pinned chiefs continued standing and bowed their heads at the benediction by Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Lynelle Wagner, of Navy Operational Support Center Guam, to close the ceremony.

The new chiefs were in agreement that their new authority and responsibility will help them to keep the U.S. Navy the best and strongest in the world.

“The comparison as being a chief over as a first class, I have more opportunities and open doors now to shape Sailors into the instruments the Navy needs them to be,” said Chief Logistics Specialist (SW/EXW/AW) Carlos Cantu, of submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39).

For more information about the traditions and rank of the chief petty officer, visit www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq46-1.htm.

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