Know the ins and outs of tuition assistance

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Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (AW) Ricardo Danan, of USS Frank Cable, looks at educational brochures in the Navy College Office on U. S. Naval Base Guam (NBG) Sept. 11. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeremy Starr/Released
Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (AW) Ricardo Danan, of USS Frank Cable, looks at educational brochures in the Navy College Office on U. S. Naval Base Guam (NBG) Sept. 11. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeremy Starr/Released

Know the ins and outs of tuition assistance

by: Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeremy Starr | .
U.S. Naval Base Guam | .
published: September 21, 2012

Are you looking to further your education? Did you join the Navy and want to go to college? Or you are new to Guam, married to a service member and want to attend college while your spouse works? What do you do? How will you pay for school? How do you apply?

These are only a few the questions many prospective college students ask themselves when contemplating going back to school. However, there are ways to relieve some of the stress when it comes to financial aid, especially for service members and their families.

According to Navy College Office Director Jessica MojicaRivera on U.S. Naval Base Guam (NBG), tuition assistance (TA) for service members will cover 100% of costs for 16 accredited college credits a year.

“It’s a 100 percent TA right now in the Navy,” MojicaRivera said. “That is much better than the 75 percent I received while I was in the Navy.”

For spouses of service members, they can obtain loans through the spouse tuition aid program (STAP) from the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, but not educational grants. They are also not eligible for TA.

Once you’ve determined how much financial aid you’re able to receive, MojicaRivera suggests researching colleges you want to attend and make a list. For guidance, visit the Navy College Program and college search pages for tips on how to start searching for colleges.

“By going to school and getting a better education, you’re not benefiting your command but rather yourself,” Mojica Rivera said. “Don’t let these opportunities pass while you’re in the Navy. The time is now to take advantage of these benefits, especially at this time when so many Sailors are not being allowed to stay in a full 20 years.”

When you are ready to sit down and discuss education opportunities visit the NCO in building 1 on the second floor at NBG. You’ll find helpful information that you might have missed in your research.  

The office is full of brochures from many distant learning programs and is located next to Central Texas College (CTC) and the University of Maryland University College (UMUC), the only two colleges on base that provide classroom instruction. You will be provided educational counseling to answer any questions you may have about the process.

The NCO is open Monday-Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., including lunch. For more information, call 339-8291 or visit the Navy College Program at  https://www.navycollege.navy.mil.

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